10/16/15

The Bundesliga Blueprint by Lee Price: Book Review

The-Bundesliga-Blueprint-Lee-Price

The Precis

When Germany became World Cup champions at Brazil in 2014, the average age of their squad was an impressive 25.7, with only three players (Miroslav Klose, Roman Weidenfeller and captain Philip Lahm) in their thirties. Germany’s match winner in the final against Argentina was 22-year-old Mario Gotze, one of the many prodigies who have come to symbolise the regeneration of German football over the last decade.

But as author Lee Price highlights, the roots of this triumph can be traced back to Euro 2000, a competition in which Germany suffered an ignominious group stage exit. German football had reached its nadir and this prompted a bold, but necessary overhaul. Their football authorities embarked on a journey to rebuild Die Mannschaft, in what has become known as Germany’s ‘10-year plan’.

The ‘revolution’ has ensured that although the Bundesliga is yet to be considered the ‘biggest’ football league in Europe, it is certainly the most stable. The national team has reaped the benefits.

Drawing upon the expertise of former Germany internationals, including Michael Ballack and Jens Nowotny, as well as a number of prominent coaches and administrators in the German game, Price maps out the key factors in this success; a commitment to the holistic development of youth and coaching, maintaining a fan-centric philosophy, an emphasis on financial prudence and an unwavering determination to avoid complacency in the face of success. It is a ‘Blueprint’ which Lee believes the English should follow.

How does it relate to Beyond the Field of Play?

Fans: Stakeholders vs Customers

After subsidising tickets for Bayern Munich fans travelling to watch their team play in the Champions league against Arsenal in 2014, Bayern’s former chairman Uli Hoenness proclaimed:

“We do not think fans are like cows you milk, football has got to be for everybody. That’s the biggest difference between us and England.”

Price’s analysis of the relationship between fans and clubs is of particular interest to Beyond the Field of Play, in which fandom is a recurring theme. The Bundesliga is the best attended in Europe. Clubs are committed to providing cheap tickets in the name of inclusivity. Putting this into perspective, the cost of one Arsenal season ticket is enough to buy you ten of Bayern’s equivalent. Safe-standing terracing has also been embraced in German stadiums, which fans view as a vital component of their national game’s identity.

Then there is the 50 + 1 rule, which stipulates that clubs must retain at least 50 percent of shares, plus one share, to ensure outside investors cannot become majority stakeholders. The prominence of Supporter Liaison Officers (SLOs), who represent fan’s interests, and act as their voice in board meetings, is also crucial. This is the antithesis of the situation in England, in which fans are often treated as a commodity. As Borussia Dortmund CEO Hans-Joachim Watzke summarises:

“In England the fan is now basically a customer…But if you tell a German supporter that he is just a customer, he’s going to kill you.”

Youth & Coaching: A Holistic Approach

After the debacle of 2000, the German FA (the DFB) had a clear strategy; invest in youth. A task force was created and within two years it was compulsory for teams in the first and second division to have an academy. But this focus wasn’t just about honing footballing talent; it was also about embracing a “holistic approach.” As Price acknowledges:

“Whereas English prodigies often abandon their school lives entirely in pursuit of football dreams, the German model demanded equal focus on education in the classroom and on the training pitch.”

The CEO of the DFL (the German Football League), Christian Seifert, considers it a “social responsibility” to provide the best possible education to youngsters, while Pellegrino Matarazzo, the coach of FC Nurnberg’s Under-19 team, points out that winning is not the be-all and end-all and advocates a tailored coaching style that is geared to player’s needs. This culture has undoubtedly helped talented Germans stay grounded and maintain professionalism.

Given that many English youngsters often fall foul to the lofty expectations and pressure to achieve results, or become distracted by the riches and culture of excess that accompanies a career in football, as Price concludes, “the English game would do well to observe what’s worked for Germany – and try and apply some of it.”

Should you be reading Bundesliga Blueprint?

In one word; yes. The Bundesliga Blueprint is a well-researched and informative account of the transition undergone by German football over the last 15-years. For those with Anglo-Germanic interests, I would go as far as saying it is essential. Furthermore, it broaches a number of socio-cultural issues which are of interest to those who analyse beyond the field of play.

It is short and crisp and Price’s writing style is accessible and pithy. You could even say efficient and astute, much like the blueprint about which he is writing. While Price is clearly in awe of German football, he does seek to acknowledge its shortcomings, even if only for a chapter. But more importantly, he makes a compelling argument for why English football should seek to follow in Germany’s footsteps. After reading, you may find it hard to disagree.

The Bundesliga Blueprint — How Germany became the Home of Football by Lee Price

(Bennion Kearny, £9.99)

With thanks to Melanie Greer and Bennion Kearny for the opportunity to review this book.

04/10/14

True Bravery Lost in Football’s Hyperbole

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Manchester United fought like a brave Old Trafford side of old – it was their best display of the season.” ­Martin Keown writing for the Daily Mail

It is interesting how we perceive and use certain words. Bravery, what are the hallmarks of bravery and how is it defined?

In the Oxford dictionary brave is defined as: “Ready to face and endure danger or pain; showing courage.”

From 300 Spartans fighting to the death at the Battle of Thermopylae, to the Charge of the Light Brigade at the battle of Balaclava, throughout history acts of war-time bravery have consistently been immortalised. Today, in the absence of a prominent warrior culture, sport has become a de facto battle ground, allowing us to experience displays of sporting courage.

Of course we are often drawn into romanticised versions of bravery. According to legend, 300 Spartan’s defied the might of one million Persians. In actual fact scholars believe the Spartans were joined by a thousand Thespians and Thebans, while the might of Persia could only muster an army 100,000 strong. Spare a thought for the Thespians and Thebans who were not immortalised in the same manner as their Spartan brothers. Highlighting this is pernickety and undoubtedly the Spartan story personifies bravery. The point is, such tales lend themselves to hyperbole and sport, in particular football, is littered with examples.

“Evra and out for brave United.” – The Times Back Page, 10th April 2014.

Following Manchester United’s Champions League exit to Bayern Munich on Wednesday night, a recurring theme was noticeable. Listening to pundits, reading articles and trawling through twitter, words such as brave, valiant, admirable and courageous were being used to describe the Red Devils performance. It was all rather irksome.

Sporting bravery can take various forms, whether it’s physical, i.e. risking injury for the good of the team, or psychological, i.e. a gay athlete coming out and overcoming the trepidation of challenging stereotypes and barriers. So for a moment, let’s analyse the headline:“Evra and out for brave United.”  

What is the purpose of the word brave here? Barring Nemanja Vidic, who took one in the private parts to block Mario Mandzukic’s fierce shot and perhaps Patrice Evra’s goal, which was certainly audacious, it’s hard to pinpoint true acts of bravery during United’s performance. David Moyes didn’t drastically alter his tactics in order to deceive his opposite number – Pep Guardiola, nor did his team go toe to toe with the Germans and throw caution to the wind. You can hardly blame Moyes and United as the pressure in football is such that there is rarely room for fool-hardy acts of bravery. Thus why the word brave? It’s specious and redundant.

United’s performance was energetic (for 70 odd minutes). It was disciplined and organised until they took their ephemeral lead in the 57th minute. And it was certainly full of effort and endeavour, but that’s the least one should expect from professional players. However a brave performance? No, brave isn’t the word that should be used to summarise their defeat to Pep Guardiola’s side.

Words are important because they portray and betray the underlying beliefs and psyche of an author and the culture that author represents. In an interview with Sir Clive Woodward on BBC Radio 5 live, Queens Park Ranger midfielder, Joey Barton said.

“We love unlucky losers in this country. It’s our mindset. In football terms we are losers; we love the side that gets heroically beaten and hate sides that are successful.”

He may just have a point. A few months back I explored how the English mind-set can work to the detriment of the national team. How hopes and dreams are projected onto individuals and thus failures attributed elsewhere, eventually damaging the team’s efficacy. On this occasion, an English team’s disappointment and deficiencies were hidden under the guise of bravery. The term glorifies defeat and also reveals an inferiority complex which can have a pernicious knock on effect.

This conflates a number of issues. Firstly the word brave projects power onto the opposition. In other words Bayern are so omnipotent that only a lionhearted performance from United could have toppled the German giants, skill alone would not have been sufficient.

Granted Bayern are an extremely talented team, officially the best in Europe but Manchester United aren’t exactly minnows. If Hyde FC – currently bottom of the Skill Conference Premier – had played the reigning European champions then, perhaps, brave would’ve been apt. But this was a team that has hardly been parsimonious in the transfer market and despite their recent travails, possess a surfeit of talent. Thus inferring this was a brave performance, or an admirable defeat, implies the odds were overwhelming in the first place and this is neither conducive to self-belief nor taking responsibility.

On the other hand this rhetoric also skirts around the crux of the problem – the English Champions simply weren’t good enough. If you’ve ever studied psychology you’d recognise this as attribution theory. Admittedly there are times when all good coaches will take pressure off their players by attributing failures to external factors (referees, bad luck etc.). However there is a worrying trend in British culture to veer towards attributing super human qualities to the opposition. This creates an environment where, even stepping onto the field to battle the adversary becomes an act of heroism. Just look at Greg Dyke’s reaction to England’s World Cup draw, anyone would’ve thought Saint George’s boys were off to fight a dragon all over again.

This offers an interesting and somewhat contradictory psychological conundrum. On the one hand such language shows a damning acceptance of a team’s shortcomings, on the other it avoids addressing  inadequacies.

It’s fair to praise effort, although some pundits such as Roy Keane – the pathological  “truth sayer” – `would point out that effort should be a given. He is right and just because a team gives their all, this should not be misconstrued as bravery. It is a word thrown around with gleeful abundance in the footballing lexicon but more often than not, it makes a false comparison to true acts of bravery.

2500 years ago the Spartan’s hope was forlorn and they were rightly labelled brave. Last night Manchester United played a team superior to them and they were underdogs. However their hope was not forlorn. The numbers on the field of the Allianz Arena were even and for the 22 seconds they were in front, United were closer to winning their battle than the Spartan’s could ever have dreamed. United’s odds were considerably more favourable. Their task was daunting but achievable, not impossible. Their performance was determined but not brave. Bayern were good at the Allianz, but they weren’t Persia at Thermopylae.

02/26/14

Football Supporters and Political Protests: A Future Trend?

A demonstrator holds up a flare during a protest to demand the ouster of the Islamist-dominated government in Tunis

The world is undergoing a period of historic transition. Times are rapidly changing and many feel insecure and angry. The worst economic depression since the 1930’s has taken its toll. People are no longer willing to idly sit by and let the politicians decide their future. They have taken to the streets to voice their discontent with the economic, political and social state of affairs in their countries. The unrest in Turkey, Egypt, Brazil, Venezuela and Ukraine are just are few of the recent examples.

On the Channel 4 news, a man from the Donetsk region (a staunch pro-Russian area of Eastern Ukraine) gave insight into why he opposed a move toward the Europeanisation of Ukraine.

“On February the 1st the demonstration for the legalisation of bestiality in Berlin, I heard there are 100,000 people practicing bestiality in Germany.” He continued.

“In Lithuania they were only seven votes short of passing a law where 6-year-olds would learn not only about sex between men and women but also homosexuality.”

Having watched the interview the man’s scathing attack on the Germans felt slightly reminiscent of the irrational fervour that swept Europe during the 1930’s. Since when have the Germans been known for bestiality? He portrayed them as inferior animals who indulge in these backward practices, much like the blood libel that was sporadically perpetrated throughout the Middle-Ages and 20th century in Europe. This was coupled with archaic views on sexuality; however the man made no coherent economic or political argument for why Ukraine should move towards the East and Russia. It was a bizarre justification for the rejection of the European Union and a worrying one at that.

The man and his compatriots were also wearing orange and black ribbons on their coats. They appeared to be a badge of identity and far from being an expert on Ukraine and Eastern Europe I initially associated the colours with the city’s biggest football club – FC Shakhtar Donetsk. However having consulted Manuel Veth, a Phd student researching economics and politics of Soviet and post-Soviet football, he informed me that the orange and black tassels were actually the ribbons of St George. These ribbons constitute one of the most recognised and respected symbols of military valour in modern Russia. However my supposition that they were connected to football supporters may not be a coincidence.

There are striking similarities between many of the aforementioned protests. One recurring theme which deserves further scrutiny is the role of organised football supporters within the demonstrations in Egypt, Turkey and Ukraine.

The politicisation of organised fans or Ultras is well-documented. On occasion this has led to the dissemination of deplorable political views within the football stadia. However while these organised groups are infamous for their tendency towards mindless chaos, the recent global turmoil has demonstrated the social and political sway they hold. The fiercest of rivals have, if only momentarily, put their differences aside and united in a cause which goes far beyond the echelons of football support.

 Ukraine – Defenders of the right to protest

Protests quickly escalated in Ukraine with thousands taking to the streets. (Photo from http://www.businessinsider.com/)

Protests quickly escalated in Ukraine with thousands taking to the streets. (Photo from http://www.businessinsider.com/)

Parts of Ukraine have become a war-zone in the last couple of weeks and the most recent development has seen president Viktor Yanukovych ousted in what is increasingly looking like a bona fide revolution. One of the more idiosyncratic features of this insurrection has been the involvement of Ukrainian Ultras.

In a piece titled ‘Ukrainian Ultras and the Unorthodox Revolution’ on their blog – FutbolgradDavid McArdle and Manuel Veth state the Ultras are being portrayed by Western media as protectors of Euromaidan. In their words: “Rather than protesting per se they purport to be apolitical, merely protecting those who wish to express their dissent.”

The article acknowledges the Ultras have their own motivations for taking to the streets. These include battling government hired thugs – Titushky and the special forces of the police – Berkut. But they have also demonstrated a level of organisation and political awareness, advocating the right to freedom of speech. Even supporters of clubs in Eastern Ukraine (notoriously Pro-Russian) have in some cases opposed government forces fighting for the rights of the dissidents. The Ultras, like the wider population of Ukraine have grown weary of self-serving oligarchs.

Egypt – A Footballing Coup

Egyptian Ultras take to the street to protest. (Photo from http://mideastsoccer.blogspot.co.uk/)

Egyptian Ultras take to the street to protest. (Photo from http://mideastsoccer.blogspot.co.uk/)

“We always say that our revolution started in 2007 not 2011. Most of the group was thinking freedom all the way. We went down to the streets to be part of the revolution as Egyptian citizens, not as Ultras.”  Taken from the Channel 4 website, the quote is by Ahmed Gaffer a founding member of Al Ahly’s militant Ultra Group Al Ahlawy – soldiers of the Egyptian revolution.

In January 2011, hundreds of thousands of Egyptians spilled into the streets to call for an end to president Hosni Mubarak’s reign. During this period the football stadium was an outlet for popular discontent at a time when freedom of speech was highly curtailed. When the uprising began the fans simply took their defiance onto the streets. Historic differences between the Ultras of Cairo clubs Al Ahly (Ultras Al Ahlawy) and Zamalek (The Ultras White Knights) were put aside. James Dorsey, an academic who writes extensively on Football in the Middle East, summarised their role.

 “It was Ahly and Zamalek Ultras who led marches into Tahrir Square and in some areas, where security forces had blocked exits, it was Ultras who would stand on roofs and threw down Molotov cocktails.”

They defended protestors against the police and helped the people overcome their trepidation about challenging the regime. Mubarak eventually fell in February 2011. After the Port Said tragedy in 2012 there was a gradual political disengagement from the Ultras. Yet for a brief moment they had discovered that they could wield a political power by uniting, using their experience in defying authority for the benefit of change.

Turkey: Gezi Park and the Football Ultras

Turkish supporters united in Gezi Park protests against

Supporters from Turkish clubs Besiktas, Galatasaray and Fenerbahce united in Gezi Park protests against Recep Tayyip Eerdogan’s regime. (Photo from uk.eurosport.yahoo.com)

Turkey tells a similar tale. In May, 2013, around 50 environmentalists began a protest in Istanbul’s Gezi Park to prevent its demolition. The initially peaceful protest provoked a ruthless response from the Turkish police and the protest quickly swelled with numbers in excess of 10,000.

Many Turkish football fans, especially Beşiktaş JK’s militant Ultra group Çarşi were already opposed to Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government (The Justice and Development Party’s – AKP). The regimes introduction of restrictive measures on human rights combined with the oppressive police tactics used at Gezi Park saw Çarşi join the protesters. Yasmin Çongar  a writer on Turkish affairs  claims the Ultras were keen to share their experiences in dealing with tear gas with their Gezi Park compatriots, and they took a front line role shielding the demonstrators from police brutality.

More importantly the insurgent ardour helped achieve something which most sport commentators thought impossible. Just like in Egypt and Ukraine, this political maelstrom saw fans from rival clubs Fenerbahçe and Beşiktaş unite. Although their influence did not extend to toppling a regime they played a pivotal role in opposing the government. In recent weeks trouble in Turkey has flared once again and Fenerbahçe supporters have been at the forefront of the largest anti-government demonstrations since the Gezi Park protests on Taksim Square back in 2013.

Football protests and defiance, a history and future

Football has long been a setting where views and opinions are rarely stymied. A trawl through history provides ample examples.

In the Communist, totalitarian state of Soviet Russia, Spartak Moscow (named after the Roman rebel Spartacus) represented a symbol of defiance against the state, who controlled Moscow’s biggest teams including Dynamo Moscow (run by secret police) and CSKA (the armies team). The Hungarian team of the 1950’s (the marvellous Magyars) led by their revolutionary talisman Ferenc Puskas, opened the eyes of a nation to the possibility of change from the rigid functionality of the apparatchik Matyas Rakosi’s regime.

In Nazi-Germany, Bayern Munich – a club with a Jewish president and Jewish manager  battled to survive during Hitler’s dictatorship. The club was persecuted for its Jewish links but Bayern became an outlet for resistance. Their players engaged in acts of defiance such as brawling with Nazi Brown Shirts and one player by the name of Willy Simetsreiter, went out of his way to have his picture taken with Jesse Owens.

 Bayern Munich honour ex Jewish president Kurt Landauer in a game vs. Eintracht Frankfurt. (Photo from http://www.101greatgoals.com/)

Bayern Munich honour ex Jewish president Kurt Landauer in a game vs. Eintracht Frankfurt. (Photo from http://www.101greatgoals.com/)

Today football supporters are uniting against what they see as an intransigent and inequitable hierarchy. These groups are not just a dishevelled bunch of hooligans, what makes them so powerful is that many of them are not mindless. I return to the man I sited earlier who expressed his views on Channel 4.

Are his views xenophobic? Certainly. Does he lack political consciousness? I doubt it. He represents the thousands of people who are uncomfortable with the changes in modern society. These ideas reflect insecurities about socially evolving issues such as national identity, race, and homosexuality etcetera.

Therein lies the risk attached to the mobilisation of Ultra groups. There is a reason why Ultras in these countries have been suppressed. As noble as their revolutionary causes, they have the power and potential to ignite a movement with much more sinister consequences, for example in Ukraine where fascist and white supremacist elements have been highly prominent in the recent uprising. It will be intriguing to observe how the role of the Ultras in the political grappling evolves.

We are witnessing a phenomenon that we can expect to see more of. Football is a game which mirrors the society in which it exists. In Brazil we have seen FIFA become a pariah due to the countries social and economic deficiencies. This in a country where one of their greatest ever World Cup winners, Ronaldo, proclaimed “football is in our blood.”

Bayern Munich fans unveil banner reading "Football is everything including gay" (Photo from http://suedkurve-muenchen.org/wp-content/gallery/fc-bayern-eintracht-frankfurt-02-02-2014/30.jpg%5D)

Bayern Munich fans unveil banner reading “Football is everything including gay” (Photo from http://suedkurve-muenchen.org/wp-content/gallery/fc-bayern-eintracht-frankfurt-02-02-2014/30.jpg%5D)

If football supporters can harness their involvement in politics and fight for positive, social reform, then the role of football in enacting social change could grow ever more relevant. Bayern Munich supporters provided the world with a perfect example when they unveiled a banner in a game against Eintracht Frankfurt this season reading “Fußball ist alles, auch schwul” (Football is everything, including gay).

Who knows people might look back at this period and pinpoint it as a moment of genuine change. Whether that will be for the better or for the worse only time will tell. However don’t be surprised if the role of football and its supporters becomes a leitmotif in this epoch of social and political transition.

02/7/14

Random Rambles Part I: Bayern’s Trendsetters and Sochi Grievances

So Nicholas Anelka is awaiting the result of his appeal against the FA’s decision to ban him for his quenelle gesture, Brazilian protesters are still threatening to crash this summer’s world cup fiesta, Bayern Munich fans demonstrated a forward thinking approach to homosexuality in football and the Sochi Winter Olympics are upon us and the maelstrom surrounding the games only seems to be worsening. You can add stray dogs and journalists to the list of groups who feel a sense of injustice.

Over the next few days I will be posting my thoughts on the aforementioned issues starting with Bayern’s forward thinking fans and Sochi’s growing list of grievances.

“Football is everything, including gay”

As I have frequently mentioned football has an omnipotence to mobilise change and last Sunday’s game between Bayern Munich and Eintracht Frankfurt demonstrated a refreshing facet of this. During the match the supporters of Bayern Munich unveiled a banner that read “Fußball ist alles, auch schwul” (Football is everything, including gay). Football clubs often involve themselves in campaigns tackling social discrimination, whether it be racism, sexism or homosexuality however what was so refreshing about this incident was seeing the fans take the initiative.

Bayern Munich fans unveil banner reading "Football is everything including gay" (Photo from http://suedkurve-muenchen.org/wp-content/gallery/fc-bayern-eintracht-frankfurt-02-02-2014/30.jpg%5D)

Bayern Munich fans unveil banner reading “Football is everything including gay” (Photo from http://suedkurve-muenchen.org/wp-content/gallery/fc-bayern-eintracht-frankfurt-02-02-2014/30.jpg%5D)

At times maligned and frowned upon, some football supporters (especially the more stalwart and passionate elements) have come in for criticism regarding their behavior and attitudes towards race, gender and sexuality. This is often justified and on occasions discrimination has plagued the stands of football stadia. Yet given the power and sway some of these fan groups hold, if they can transmit forward thinking and positive ideals to a global audience then the social significance of this should not be underestimated.

The Bavarian club’s supporters message was simple and hopefully it takes hold across the world. Just like anything, your sexuality should not be an issue and recently the archaic dogmas surrounding homosexuality within football are being challenged. From Robbie Rogers being an openly gay player in the MLS, to Thomas Hitzlsperger coming out and becoming the highest profile name to talk about his sexuality within football, the Bayern banner constitutes another step forward. There is a long journey ahead before we can render the game so many of us hold dear as all-inclusive but recent events represent progress.

It is worth noting the Bayern supporters also organised an impressive choreography dedicated to their former president Kurt Landauer, a Jew who was persecuted during the Nazi regime. So hats off to the supporters of Bayern Munich for jettisoning the old and exhibiting a forward thinking approach. Lets hope others take heed.

The grievances pile up at the Sochi Olympics.

Just a line on the Sochi Winter Olympics, which are now officially under way. Vladimir Putin and the Russian government could do with taking a leaf out of the Bayern supporters books.

The Olympics is a celebration of ‘sporting civility’ which includes such principles as ‘democracy, internationalism, equal rights and civic education’. That the Winter Games are being held in Russia, a country which in 2013 signed a statute criminalising support for ‘non-traditional’ relationships’ is questionable to say the least. Although the Russian government have insisted the law doesn’t forbid homosexuality, but merely prevents dissemination of gay ‘propaganda’ among those under eighteen, the issue has become a hot bed of controversy.

LBGT supporters take to the streets to protests against the Sochi Olympics. (Photo from www.businessweek.com)

LBGT supporters take to the streets to protests against the Sochi Olympics. (Photo from www.businessweek.com)

Gay and liberal activists across the world have expressed their outrage at this obsolete law, which if breached can incur penalties from fines to jail sentences and for foreigners even deportation. More worryingly the president of the Russian Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Sports Federation, Konstantin Yablotsiky, has claimed that the law has to an extent legalised neo-Fascist anti-gay groups to become more active, with violent attacks on LGBT protesters a common occurrence.

The astronomical cost of the games (the most expensive in history) has also led to widespread discontent among Sochi residents and the allegations of corruption and environmental damage aimed at those who constructed the Olympic village has further damaged the hosts reputation before the games have even begun. Furthermore there remains a major concern over security at the Olympics with the threat of terrorist attacks ever-present. Add this to the latest developments which has seen a mass culling of stray dogs and journalists having been left without suitable accommodation and it becomes hard to make one water tight case for why Sochi should be hosting an Olympic games.

The ignominious law regarding gay rights and the numerous blunders cannot be readily altered. But sport can act as a catalyst for change and this may be the one saving grace. Using the words of New Zealander Blake Skejellerup, a gay speed skater who came out after competing at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics:

“Sochi gives us an opportunity to highlight Russia’s anti-gay propaganda laws and say: this is wrong. Don’t underestimate how powerful that could be.”

Unfortunately Skejellerup narrowly missed out on qualification for Sochi however he is right, if anything at all the 2014 Winter Olympics constitute a possibility for progress, not just in Russia, but across the globe.